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sonrisu
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2014 6:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Woah, that is awesome!
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep. What I loved about it before is it was the only GL debugger that had a geometry viewer too (most are just textures, buffers, command queue and shaders). I expect to use it regularly during development, 'cause ya, it's great. ;)
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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2014 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got Friends?




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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2014 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Explosive chicken powerup?
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PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2014 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote




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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote




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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2014 6:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Loot!



All 3 are edible.
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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2014 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pixel art with Alpha test.


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PostPosted: Thu May 15, 2014 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Taking a break from the hardest stuff (Networking) to get layouts for UI working. Line spacing experiment.
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

what motivates you?
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I lived across the country in a hotel room for 4 months doing an on-site contract gig this past summer. It was some bullshit HTML/Android thing terribly designed by a company in Sweden for a broken web browser on TV set top boxes. So many layers of bullshit and wasted time and effort. OMFG.

I never want to go back to that again.

If I was to pursue game work, I would end up at a studio doing mindless HTML MMO development, likely leading an engineering team (back end or front end).

I would rather make something/anything myself. I don't want to go back.

These past few years, I've been fumbling to make what I'll call story/mood driven games. Requiring high standards that I really had no idea how to achieve. The unknowns, those were very demotivating. I set my own standards too high, and it cannibalized my own motivation many times over. I even ended up deciding that a certain game of mine, I simply could not share the workload and keep the vision. Not to mention, I don't exactly have a team, or spare money to hire one. I tried that, burning through cash 8 years ago. It didnt work. My solo work, Smiles, 6 years ago was my only success post job (well that and Ludum Dare).

The new project, STACHE, is actually the remains of a project MRK I started late last year. I think it was a good concept, but far too ambitious (visually and design wise). Too many rules kept cropping up, which meant a lot of work to show anything. I needed to break the cycle.

So again, STACHE, after 10 some years of avoiding (serious) pixel art, I went back to pixel art. I can handle pixels. I'm quick at it, unlike other means. The new stuff I get to play with and learn is Skeletal Animation (Spine). That's what makes pixel art interesting again, changing how we animate. This is a theme of STACHE: pushing my comfort zone, and not going too overboard.

The game itself is specifically designed to be silly. Not necessarily funny (I will try), but far less serious than anything I've done. Less grand vision, more "lets have a good time".

There are still a few specific things:
- Need to be able to play with friends (locally and remotely)
- it should lend itself to amusing situations.
- it should be a game several friends can decide to pick up and play for a few hours, cooperatively (but you can totally be a dick).
- Moustache themed hero (need a central theme. Totally a coincidence that my last game was about the mouth (smile) and we've moved just up. Game 3 will totally be about noses)
- robust platformer and combat mechanics (coming)
- if other games would do something one way, don't be afraid to try another way

It's refreshing not being restricted by some grand vision/emotion I'm trying to convey. Just be "fun". Be dumb even. There's nothing wrong being dumb.

There are plenty of technical challenges ahead even in this simpler game (my bread and butter), but given that its pixel art'ish visuals, I can crank out usable assets and things in mere hours, and have them in the game. Making something work in game can be such a motivator, and I can do it quickly this way (unlike MRK).


So what motivates me? The fear of not being able to do what I want anymore; Working on a game that's NOT some impossible grand vision, one that will change and evolve as we go; And making something that makes me and others smile.


The game feels very different. Most of my failed other projects excited me; This one makes me happy. Very different sides of the coin.

* * *

Oh, I'm also setting monthly deadlines, but more importantly I do a development livestream every week (twice usually). It's something I've been doing in secret up until now (broadcasting in our Ludum Dare Twitch "channel"). The livestream stops me from doing my usual procrastinating. I need to talk to the viewers as they ask question, but those interruptions are far better than my usual net/reddit/email/twitter surfing I often do. The rule of "live" is you're on the whole time. You're not necessarily entertaining the whole time, but you're focused on the viewers or the work.

I've never been a huge structure guy, but some structure can still feel right. I broadcast every Thursday for a few hours in the afternoon (later if things come up). I should do another today, but I haven't decided yet. I've done 7 and 10 hour broadcasts before.

If anyone's feeling curious, I go by PoVRAZOR on Twitch. Hit the Ludum Dare website, and if I'm on, you'll see me in the twitch sidebar widget (usually near the top, tee hee).

I'm still doing a lot of engineering work, which is why I haven't started publicly pimping my streams yet. Developing and testing complex systems is only so exciting, plus it gives me time to practice being "on". When I do start inviting people to watch, I would like to be at my best. :)
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Alex
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hm.. I've noticed with my own projects, that they tend to excite me early on, so when you say that this project makes you happy as opposed to excited, is there a way to determine the difference? Like is there anything specific that you could say are the reasons for it? Or is it more so because there aren't any reasons..? If something is exciting, it's usually because there is a stimulant.. But if something makes a person happy, is it lacking stimulation?, and in what ways does it? Perhaps this is more a question I should ask myself, but I figure I'd ask you anyways.
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I don't know yet if it's something that can be harnessed, but all I have to do to get that smile back on my face is tell someone about my game, or show them the game. Even the lazy opening line "It's a game with a mustached dude, and you punch chickens" elicits something. Shock, surprise, a laugh, a giggle, or a smile. If I talk a little more about the silly things in the game, the silly goals of it, almost every time they start throwing suggestions right back at me. It's unique in that you don't even have to understand how the game works or plays to have a conversation. And as an artist, you want people to like what you do, and it's so easy to start the conversation since its so dumb. There are themes to the game (Moustache, survival), but they don't limit the possibilities. So many things are open to suggestion, and nobody has to be serious. It's refreshing, not having to sell a game on buzzwords, genres, and intent.

So while the game doesn't excite me the same way as others (punching and moustaces aren't "cool"), I'm easily motivated because its already making people smile, before it even exists. I don't need the playable demo or trailer to begin the feedback loop; It's already happening. Even the live streaming, there's 20+ people watching me today ramble about stuff and code subsystems. If I need a kick, I do a livestream. There's always someone new to find me.

Anyway, that about covers my 30 minute break. Back to the show!
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder what "gel" stands for? Game e? language?
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Game Engine Library. It's a library for creating 'engines'. Partially a critique on the sillyness of "everything is an engine" from a long long time ago, and that engine re-use itself is somewhat rare. I started using the name in, I think, 2007, after my Xbox game project PuffBOMB HD imploded. That codebase and tools were extremely not-reusable, so I started isolating and creating actually re-usable code in a more C style than C++ style. Best decision I'd made in a long time. It lead to several prototypes, then finally Smiles HD in 2008.

Mainline Gel is on it's 3rd major iteration, "GEL3" as the directory is called. A cross platform codebase for PC, Mobile, and Consoles. The focus today is mainly on Console'ish games, meaning the ordinary touch and mouse input code isn't in that great of shape. Last year I started experimenting with an integrated scripting language and real-time editing. It's a bit of a mess, but awesome at times.

A related project to Gel is GelHTML, or in other words the Web version of Gel. This is the 2nd major iteration of GelHTML, literally started last week. I've been doing some research on HTML'isms over the past couple weeks, between helping my brother move and annoying dentist visits. ;)

The original GelHTML was around 2011, me getting used to JavaScript, and porting things over that I wanted. That lead to some prototypes that I don't think I shared publicly. After that I started experimenting with Emscripten, the C/C++ compiler to JavaScript, and that lead to Nook and Bearly Seasoned. Ultimately the goal was to combine mainline Gel and GelHTML so games were portable across browsers and devices. Unfortunately, there was too much legacy in Gel1 and Gel2, and a clean slate was needed. NOTE: Gel1 and Gel2 were used together (Gel2 with parts of Gel1). Gel2 was really more of a big intermediary step between Gel1 and Gel3, reworking everything, switching to Shader based rendering.

Gel3 was created after Gel2 and GelHTML, removing the legacy while keeping GelHTML issues mind (Async Ready).

Oh, another thing about the originial GelHTML is that browser features like Audio and Gamepad support were terrible back then. Today however, Gamepads, WebGL, Audio Playback, Fullscreening, Networking, and so many little things work correctly now. Internet Explorer is getting every missing feature of mine, except WebRTC (UDP) networking in IE 12. We are so very close. Plus, you can easily embed it on a blog, or right here on a forum in an iframe. :D


The original GelHTML was a hacky C/C++ like library. The New GelHTML is a simple, flexible library designed for quickly prototyping things. Here's what a simple program that loads an image and displays it looks like:

Code:
// - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - //
var ctx;
// - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - //
function Setup() {
    Bird = gelLoadImage("Chicken.png");

    // Once Loaded //
    gelOnLoad(function(){
        ctx = gelSimpleSetup();
        gelSimpleStart( ctx );
    });
}
// - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - //

// - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - //
function Step() {
}
// - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - //
function Draw() {
    ctx.drawImage(Bird, 100,100);
}
// - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - //


Right now it's relying on Canvas2D contexts for draw code, but loading and synchronizing to 60 FPS is simple (i.e. it's done for you). Eventually there will be a proper graphics API, as I want to gut the Canvas2D stuff and switch to WebGL. There will also be C/C++ support again, once things switch to WebGL. Then it should be possible to write something in C/C++ Gel and run it on the web, shaders, 3D and all. Right now though, I'm focusing on the JavaScript side.

Ludum Dare is just over a week away, so I want New GelHTML to be ready for it.

The other thing I'm dabbling with right now is Networking. The thing that brought me to a halt on Stache, besides moving (myself and my brother a month apart), was Networking. With a bunch of work and hacking of the scripting language, I could probably get 2 players reasonably synchronized across the internet, at most 4. I'll totally admit though, good networking is a lot more challenging than I gave credit. Now that I've been in this headspace a while, I've come to realize how terrible things really are, and that what we do is everything we can to hide how terrible it is from the players. The best online games are the ones where the players have no idea how terrible things are, and that's so much easier if you don't directly interact with other players.

It's been interesting.

On my short list of things I want to try, I want to make a simple multiplayer game with a server written in NodeJS (i.e. JavaScript command line). Some of that's already figured out, but given everything I know about HTML/JavaScript now, the old GelHTML really felt terrible to use.


So near term, I'm working on GelHTML (GelHTML2 really), where the goal is to make it something I can prototype quick little things with. And if I somehow find the time, I want to get a simple server based multiplayer game working.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 6:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PoV wrote:
Today however, Gamepads, WebGL, Audio Playback, Fullscreening, Networking, and so many little things work correctly now. Internet Explorer is getting every missing feature of mine, except WebRTC (UDP) networking in IE 12. We are so very close. Plus, you can easily embed it on a blog, or right here on a forum in an iframe. :D
That reads like the future is already here, the "everything in the browser"-future, the "no downloads/unzips/installs needed"-future, the "no platform-specific build process needed"-future, the "all previously written code for compiled languages employing a gazillion different archaic libs for anything we ever developed before is obsolete now"-future. That is both exciting and a bit frustrating(for all that wasted time). :D

It really seems that we(developers and users alike) are indeed moving towards a reality in which The Browser becomes the only platform worth/necessary targeting anymore. That's actually pretty sweet. The only dependency developers need is the browser. The only requirement users need is the browser. Browser vendors who do not bother to keep their products compatible will be left behind for good (like OS developers who vanished when they did not bother to keep up with other standards in the past).

It seems like there is no excuse for me to keep using C/C++ and Allegro or SDL or Java or whatever else. HTML5 really seems to be the way to go these days.

Performance issues will probably be sorted out and addressed by better implementations of the HTML5 components on the browser side over time and JIT compilers for the scripts, so that's nothing we really need to worry about (as long as we don't develop a browser of our own ;) ).

It sounds a bit too good to be true though... wasn't "write once, run everywhere" already the idea behind Java. So why is not everyone just using Java today? Isn't the browser just another virtual machine, another layer of indirection in the whole mess of different standards and systems? Today, The Browser is a specialized piece of software which runs inside another piece of software called the Operating System... now with the HTML5 stuff, The Browser wants more and more direct access to system components which are driven by The Operating system to compete with performance of "native" code. The logical consequence is that The Browser would at some point want to replace the OS completely to eliminate any unnecessary layers of indirection: Everything we keep on our machines would be accessed in the browser in a single uniform way, all our programs would be local websites written in HTML5... it might become so complex that you could not tell the difference between an OS like Windows is today and The Browser which is driving your machine and over time it may become so bloated that people might yearn for something simple, something easy to use, like the very first HTML standard was for a limited number of highly specialized tasks like displaying information in a simple, uniform way and people might start using that new simple language inside their "Browser OS" to do their stuff and forget about the bloat... and over time, they may yearn to have some more control... more direct access to other things in that new simple language and start expanding it... until it will eventually replace the Browser from the inside out like the browser wants to replace the OS from the inside out today. This is madness of epic proportion. :D

The conclusion is: We(in the software world) seem to be living in a world of bloat and we keep re-inventing it, adding layer over layer over layer of indirection. Will we ever see the end of it? Will it at some point peak and reach an optimal state where we can "just do" whatever it is we want to do with our machines in a globally standardized way without having to re-invent the wheel for each new layer of indirection until it replaces the previous layer? Would the world be better off with a single OS towards which every developer on the planet would dedicate their time to? I think yes. So maybe this ever on-going repeating cycle of wheel-reinvention is necessary to kill software incompatibilities for good. How many years until we are there? Goodbye Windows, goodbye Linux, goodbye MacOS, welcome WorldOS! :)

ANYWAY, I think I will look into HTML5 because it's fucking sexy being able to point people to an URL and let them take a look at your stuff, ideally free of any hassle on their side with having to download/install anything besides a compliant browser of course. :)
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dennis wrote:
That reads like the future is already here

Scary huh? :)

That's why I can't ignore it anymore. I've said it a few times that given the state of the web on desktop, Allegro is an archaic relic that should be forgotten because it doesn't provide a benefit anymore. Mind you, I am partial to SDL2 these days. Native code will always provide better performance, and when we start digging in to SIMD and OpenCL stuff, the performance gains there are still many, but there's a spec for everything to *some day* come to the web. Truthfully though, most people don't care about that. For most people, the web of today is more than adequate.

To be fair, the Mobile side does need improvement. Chrome and Firefox on Android do run the exact same versions as the desktop, so my crazy test works there too, but you do need a current device for best performance. My realtime audio synthesis is lagging on Chrome Android, but runs fine on Firefox Android. Again, those sort of things will fix themselves over time. What matters is they actually work.

I need to do more homework on iOS and Safari browser compatibility, and perhaps Blackberry and Kindle browser compatibility as well. Maybe as a curiosity, WebOS TV browser compatibility (I have an LG TV). But realistically, aside from iOS and Safari, those other browsers don't matter too much. Heck, Opera is a webkit fork now (the core that all non-Firefox and non-IE browsers are based on).

Quote:
It sounds a bit too good to be true though... wasn't "write once, run everywhere" already the idea behind Java. So why is not everyone just using Java today? Isn't the browser just another virtual machine, another layer of indirection in the whole mess of different standards and systems?

I think Java shoehorned itself in to that desire to be the 'write once' thing. Once the idea of a web browser plugin became a thing, then suddenly it made sense. Thing is, apparently both languages "appeared" in 1995, JavaScript created to give *some* programmability to web pages, but at the time Java was more focused on performance. But Java was always a plugin. At some point, Flash offset Java as the language of high end web apps. So like every good programming language (C/C++), it's taken ~20 years to reach its prime, and along the way it has stolen every good idea it could. Now finally the middleman does near everything, so we don't need plugins anymore.

Quote:
The logical consequence is that The Browser would at some point want to replace the OS completely to eliminate any unnecessary layers of indirection

Yep, and they call themselves Chrome OS and Firefox OS. A lightweight Linux that only runs a browser. There's really no point to rewrite all the device handling stuff, since Linux is doing a fine job of it, and it can be thinned out to a minimum (just that). Like this concept of reusable code, the Linux/Unix way of thinking is self contained modules, mix and match take and use what you want. The browser guys don't have to waste time on system level stuff, all the nuances. They just have to focus on Linux support (which they do anyway).

Quote:
ANYWAY, I think I will look into HTML5 because it's fucking sexy being able to point people to an URL and let them take a look at your stuff, ideally free of any hassle on their side with having to download/install anything besides a compliant browser of course. :)

Ya, I recommend it. Of course it has its own oddities and quirks, but everything has those.
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Gil
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All hail the Javascript :)
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey PoV, the audio doesn't work in that thing you embedded. It works in chrome, but not in firefox. I just hear little snaps as if it is trying to start it but cutting off as soon as it does.
Also, what are your thoughts on Construct 2?.. I recently started using it because I don't want to get stuck in code and all I want to do is just make a game, I'm not trying to be a coding wizard.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alex wrote:
Hey PoV, the audio doesn't work in that thing you embedded. It works in chrome, but not in firefox. I just hear little snaps as if it is trying to start it but cutting off as soon as it does.
Same here. Probably related to this: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/21288726/web-audio-playing-back-in-chrome-but-not-firefox/21289583#21289583 as also described as the last issue here: http://blog.szynalski.com/2014/04/02/web-audio-api/ something about the audio buffer becoming immutable in FireFox after assignment.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm using Firefox 31 on Linux (Ubuntu) and Android, and for me it seems to work fine.

At least with the synthesis stuff, I know there was an old function that was Firefox only (now obsolete). myWebAudioContext.createScriptProcessor is what is supposed to be used, and the old way way myWebAudioContex.createJavascriptNode.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/AudioContext.createJavaScriptNode <- Obsolete
https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/AudioContext.createScriptProcessor

But apparently that was resolved back in Firefox 25. Aside from that, I'm not sure.

Guess I need to fire up my Windows machine to see if I can reproduce.

Alex wrote:
Also, what are your thoughts on Construct 2?.. I recently started using it because I don't want to get stuck in code and all I want to do is just make a game, I'm not trying to be a coding wizard.

I haven't used it, so I'm not too familiar. But I have heard from some folks do like it. I think we may have done a promo-deal with them way back during one of the Ludum Dares too.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah interesting. I thought I had solved the Firefox "double focus" problem (i.e. Firefox will sometimes get 2x "onfocus" events), so I'm effectively connecting the node to the audio context twice. Again, no audible glitches on Linux, so I'll have to try Windows.

That said though, onblur should be triggering first, since the webpage has the focus, not the iframe.

Hmm.

Here's the direct link: http://sykhronics.com/Simple/

EDIT: Yes confirmed, my synthesis is not working on Firefox 31 on Windows 7.


Guess I should fire up the Mac too. That sounds like a good thing to tackle today: compatibility.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Made some tweaks so it works in Safari 6 and on iOS 6. The problem there was that requestAnimationFrame was named webkitRequestAnimationFrame. Also the audio will now work on desktop Safari 6, but not on iOS Safari 6. I think I do know how to fix it, but I'll settle for not crashing (as iOS 6 and Safari 6 are quite dated).

Going to run out and buy a computer keyboard. Then I'll be back on the Windows Firefox audio problems.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phew! After hours of fiddling, I finally figured out what was wrong with the Firefox Windows audio.

I'll post a new build shortly, after I clean up a bit.
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