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PoV
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:03 pm    Post subject: Cooking Thread. Ya, that's food making yo! Reply with quote

Like every other resource thread, but this ones is for food making. Seriously.

It rarely comes up here, but actually one of my favorite things to do is to make (and eat) good food. I have a few "signature" things I make, and some I'm working on. I tend to prefer tasty and low mess foods to healthy foods though. I should probably fix that. ;)
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, the whole reason I started this thread was so I had a place to store this gem. From the comments:

http://deep-fried.food.com/recipe/popeyes-fried-chicken-copycat-89925

On Popeye's Fried Chicken:

Quote:
For everyone saying that this doesn't taste like real Popeye's chicken, I can tell you all why. I used to work at Popeye's many years ago when I was high school. There are 2 main discrepancies in this recipe which are: (1) How to Season and (2) How to Fry the chicken. I personally seasoned the chicken on may occasions, and although it was prepackaged from the main New Orleans warehouse, it had a LOT of cayenne pepper. We used long rubber gloves to mix the seasoning with the chicken. I'd still end up with seasoning on my upper arms and they would burn for hours afterwards. My eyes would burn as well from the fumes. This recipe calls for a teaspoon of cayenne, but you'll need to, at the very least, double that. I'd say you'd want to triple it to 3 teaspoons. I also remember a faint vinegar smell to the chicken as well while seasoning, so it was either Tabasco sauce or just plain vinegar. I'd wager it was Tabasco, though. How much Tabasco to use? You'd have to experiment. We also would let the chicken sit overnight in the cooler in storage bins to marinate the seasoning, and that is key as well. Not sure if it makes any difference, but we always used Tyson brand chicken, which many grocery stores carry. As for frying, the batter was actually a light milky color, not straight eggs and seasoning. I'm not sure what made it milky, but I'd guess it was (surprise!) milk. It may have been cream, also. Again, you'd have to play with it to get it right. I do know the batter and the flour was seasoned as well. I'd bet you could use the same seasoning on the chicken, minus the Tabasco, for the flour and then add the seasoning and Tabasco to the batter. I do know for sure that we double-battered the chicken. This gives it the really thick, crispy crust we all love! For those who aren't familiar with a double-batter, it's simply dipping the chicken in the batter and flour, shake and then repeat your batter dip again. Remember to shake the chicken after each dip! We used round wire baskets with a wire handle to put the chicken in for battering. This allowed for quick dipping, shaking, dipping and then a final shake in just a few seconds. We never waited to put the chicken in the grease after battering. I'll also add that since the chicken is double-battered, you may want to increase the heat somewhat, or you may end up with soggy, undercooked chicken. Hope this unveils a bit more of the mystery of how to make Popeye's fried chicken! P.S. I know everyone loves Popeye's biscuits, and I do too, but if you knew what was in it, you may think twice. The recipe is about 1/2 shortening for the mix :). I think each biscuit is around 500 calories, so tread lightly (pun intended!).

Read more: http://deep-fried.food.com/recipe/popeyes-fried-chicken-copycat-89925?oc=linkback


Ya, one of my favorite splurges is Popeyes. Because of the mess, I'll never deep fry at home, but I'm hoping to extract some of the better parts of the recipe and put them in to my own pan fried chicken recipe. Love the spice.

This base recipe seems a better though:

http://www.food.com/recipe/popeyes-bonafide-spicy-chicken-copycat-444589

The quote above mentions a vinegary hot sauce, like Tabasco. It might actually be their own hot sauce, which I seem to recall being quite vinegary. I'm not really a fan of the sauce packets by itself though. This might be a similar thing to the Chalet Sauce from Swiss Chalet: Awesome as a chicken marinade, but just okay as a dipping sauce.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I make fresh home-made pizza too. I don't make my own dough, but I buy premade dough from the local Italian Market, portion it, and freeze it. I never worked at a pizzeria, so reverse engineering proper cooking method from home has been an intesesting challenge. I've been making fresh pizzas for about a year now, and I'm rather pleased with the results.

The favorite I'm making nowadays is a BBQ Chicken+Bacon pizza. Sweet BBQ sauce for sauce, pan fried chicken breast pieces, fresh bacon crumpled in to bits, onion, red pepper, with mozzarella. After prep, I can often make one in about 20 minutes. Prep requires frying up some chicken and bacon though, and the chicken especially can take time.

One of my favorite pizza crusts/sauces is Pizza Hut. There's a certain sweetness to it, topped with bacon, peperoni and pineapple just blows my mind. So one thing I do want to figure out someday is how to replicate that.

http://www.food.com/recipe/pizza-hut-original-pan-pizza-91827

Something for me to check next time I try more ordinary pizzas.


There's a local pizza chain, Marvelous Pizza. They're more on the budget end of pizzeria's (~$10 pizza), 3 locations across the city, but their is something amazing about the crust/sauce. Some secret spice I just can't figure out. I used to live on this pizza, as there was a location across the street from the College I attended. Occasionally I'll visit a location and pick on up, then spend the next few days baffled by that mystery spice. One of these days I need to begin some serious spice science. I want to know that magic.
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Gil
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Small little thing: how to make the best tempura style batter?

Tempura batters are perfect for making tempura, fish and chips or just tempura style chicken nuggets.

What you need is water and flour. That's it. Some like egg in it, I don't, it makes the dough chewy. The trick? Finding water that has as much carbonation as possible. I personally use a Soda Stream to put as much carbonation in the water as it can handle, really fizzy water. Then you just drop the water into the flour until it looks right. Don't let it sit! Make the batter just before frying, dunk in your protein of choice and throw it in a deep fryer.

This lady gets it more or less right (I don't like the baking powder):


As always, if you want to turn it into a science, go with Heston:

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, great! I've been thinking of starting up a cooking thread because it's just geeky enough to appeal to us programmer types. Also, some of us live alone and need all the help we can get ;)

My wife was an outstanding cook; sadly much of her knowledge is now lost. I've been slowly reconstructing some of her better recipes.

Quote:

I tend to prefer tasty and low mess foods to healthy foods though.


That's why I almost never fry things :) Tastes great, but oh what a mess!

I'll go ahead and donate a good (and simple) meat sauce recipe I've come up with.

Quote:

Tasty Meat Sauce
This recipe complements 2-3 servings of food.


Ingredients:

(Portion scale is linear. i.e. cut measurements in half to make half as much food)

1 lb ground chuck
1 can Classico Fire Roasted Tomato and Garlic sauce
Red cooking wine
Crushed red pepper
Olive Oil
Italian seasoning (generic kind with a blend of random herbs/spices)




Apply ~1 Tsp of olive oil to skillet or pan
Place meat in skillet
Apply generous amount of red wine to meat.
--- I have no exact measurement for this. It should all soak into the meat.

Cook meat in skillet
When cooked, drain ~75% of fat from skillet with spoon/ladle. DO NOT STRAIN.
--- Removing too much fat is detrimental to the dish's taste
--- Tilting the pan/skillet at a 45 degree angle makes the fat easy to scoop

Add entire can of tomato sauce to skillet
Lightly season skillet with Italian seasoning

Sprinkle red pepper in skillet
--- I have no exact measurement for this.
--- Pepper will dilute as it is absorbed by sauce
--- Don't be afraid to go heavy on the pepper

All ingredients are already cooked, so set skillet to low temp (turn knob to 2-3)
Warm sauce until it begins to bubble (or just before), stirring frequently
You may optionally remove large tomato chunks as you stir


If you started cooking spaghetti alongside this, both should be done at the same time.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I eat a lot of yams. They are much like sweet potato except they are easier to mash after cooking, and they cost a little more.

Quote:
Cube yams into small cubes
Cook on skillet in butter or oil of choice until tender
Add chopped onion pieces during cooking if desired
Use fork to mash final product into a paste
Add fresh ground pepper, cinnamon, other spices
Adding some quality coconut butter/oil can be fun


I have been making vegetable broths lately a bit as well, it is pretty easy and they are supposed to have good mineral content. It is just cut up vegetables, pour water and bring to boil, then simmer for an hour or two. It is very easy, I will drink it hot, that gives it the best flavor to me.
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Gil
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gil's spicing tips and tricks:

While I'm not a good cook by a long mile, I'm known for being able to season a dish really well. Here's how I work: I pick the main seasoning. Usually I go for hot, as my girlfriend and I like things rather hot, but in certain cases, I might go for, say, salty (I like my fresh salmon to taste a little salty for example).

What you do is throw the main flavor in until it's right. This is usually rather easy, as it's very one dimensional. The dish will also taste very one dimensional. After the main seasoning, add pepper, salt and/or acidity (lemon juice, zest, or maybe you want some swanky sweet/sour sauce from the local Chinese market), again, until it tastes right. Tasting is the key.

After all that is done, analyze the flavor. I find that the softer herbs, like thyme, oregano, dill, etc, all balance out the flavor to get that complexity, but by getting the main flavors (hot, sweet, sour, salt) in there first, you can just add stuff as you want. This final step is perfect to add your spice mixes, if you don't have a complex spice rack, but remember that some of them contain salt or pepper already, or might be a bit hot in case of say, a curry mix. If so, leave a little room in the flavor palette or your mix might ruin the balance.

There's some more rules to remember, like the fact that a sauce will get spicier if left boiling, as it'll become more concentrated. Also, adding milk or cream will dilute the taste more than when adding water (which still dilutes it a bit). Finally, if you like it, consider coconut milk or soy cream/milk as a replacement for milk or cream in certain dishes. I will switch to one of those, because they have a particular taste profile that can compliment certain dishes. Soy cream adds some sort of sweet flavor for example, that I quite like.

Not sure if that's helpful, but I do love seasoning dishes by hand and I dislike just throwing in a random spice mix and hoping it'll turn out right. I hope it helps someone? :D
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PoV
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gil wrote:
I do love seasoning dishes by hand and I dislike just throwing in a random spice mix and hoping it'll turn out right.

Ya, though I'll admit I do use packets when it comes to mexican (tacos, fajitas). (Soft) Tacos and Fajitas I find to be good reheat meals. Make up a whole batch, wrap them in cellophane, and fridge 'em. Then toss one in the Microwave when hungry. Speaking of which, I have chicken breast in the fridge right now I need to Fajita.

When it comes to pizzas though, I start from a very neutral (cheap) pizza sauce and add spices to it (Thyme, Oregano, Garlic Salt, etc). I think the label says it has some of those things in it, but not enough! :D

I also have this huge spice mill I treat as basically a Salt+. Good for pan frying chicken pieces, but if I'm doing a steak I'll break out the pepper mill, loosen it (bigger chunks), and add a good amount to each side (in addition to the Spice Mill). The Spice Mill has pepper in it, but again, not enough! :D
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I hear you on the spice mixes :)

We don't do our own curries for example, as you can find really good mixes at local Asian places. Thai or Chinese markets have jars upon jars of curry and tandoori mixes, and I could never get all those flavors in there.

We bake a lot of chicken (my girlfriend doesn't eat red meats) and what we do is just cut up a breast into cubes, throw in some curry or tandoori and mingle it all in the pan while baking in some olive oil. We'll throw in some extra chili and pepper and salt, but that's it :)
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cooking rice in beef or chicken broth gives it a nice little bump of flavor without having to load it down with extras.
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sirocco wrote:
Cooking rice in beef or chicken broth gives it a nice little bump of flavor without having to load it down with extras.
Yeah, this. That's a great tip.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my favourite things to eat when I'm in San Francisco is Korean Spicy Pork from the Cafeteria/food courts near Moscone. So yummy. So on a whim I decided to try making it myself.


I gave this recipe a try today. Korean style Spicy Pork:

http://www.beyondkimchee.com/spicy-korean-pork/

I neglected the sesame oil and sesame seeds (by accident), and used pancake syrup instead of corn syrup. To my surprise, the pancake syrup overpowered the smell of the marinade. It did not hurt the flavor, but I might skip the syrup next time (or just use less).



The results were really quite good. It wasn't as saucy as the Korean Spicy Pork I usually get in San Francisco, but I think I just have to make more sauce/marinade next time to get that. I'm also tempted to use more garlic.

Another thing I really liked about this recipe was how little I had to buy. Literally, the meat, a small plastic container of red pepper paste, and some ginger (which I was going to buy anyway). Everything else is a usual thing I have (garlic, onion, oil, sugar, red pepper flakes).

This recipe I can certainly see myself making more often. :)
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sonrisu
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure how I have missed this thread. We've been cooking all sorts of amazing stuff. Next time I should really snap a photo and post here when we do something new. *will try to remember*
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoa! So I tried making the spicy pork again, with my changes, and whoa!



- More Red Pepper Paste (like 5-6 tablespoons... not sure exactly. Was ~4 heaping spoonfulls)
- More Pepper Flakes (3 tablespoons, probably more)
- More Garlic (like 6 cloves, but some were small)
- Missing ingredients included this time (Sesame Oil, Sesame Seeds)

Saucy Vine: https://vine.co/v/M5aKhwaWKrb

Also I cook longer than the recipe directions. At least 10 minutes (probably more). And I was wrong about pancake syrup having a strong smell. Turns out that was just the smell of Pepper Paste, reminds me of pancake syrup. ;)

Anyway, it was excellent this time. Different than my San Francisco favourite, but still really good.

Once mixed with the meat, everything was noticeably more red this time (last time was more brown/cooked pork colored). Very happy with this.

It also seems an easy recipe to "get right". After all, it's basically just Red (Hot) Pepper Paste and Meat, plus spices.

I want to try this with Chicken some day.


So ya, I call that cooking success. :)
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over the past year I've made the Spicy Pork recipe my own. I figured I should write it down.

Code:
- 3/4 pounds of Sliced Pork (whatever the store sells)
- 1 medium Onion
- 3 heaping tablespoons of Red Pepper Paste (Gochujang)
- 4 large cloves of Garlic (or a bunch of smaller cloves)
- a piece of fresh Ginger, roughly equal to how much Garlic you're using
- 1 tablespoon Soy Sauce
- 1 tablespoon Sugar
- 1 tablespoon Pancake Syrup (some sugary syrup)
- 1 tablespoon toasted Sesame Seeds
- 2 tablespoons of Sesame Oil
- 1 tablespoon of some other Oil (Olive, Canola, whatever you pan fry with)

The Red Pepper Paste/Hot Pepper Paste is the key ingredient here. It's this wonderful thick and spicy Korean paste that pretty much defines the flavor. We sweeten it with some sugary things, jazz it up with some garlic and ginger, salt it with Soy Sauce, and finish it with some Sesame Oil and Seeds.

You'll probably have to visit a specialty Asian market to get your hands on Red Pepper Paste and Sesame Oil (and not overpay). I've unofficially dubbed my neighbourhood Chinatown, as I have a huge (and extremely busy) Chinese grocery store a few blocks from me. It's a magical place to visit, with many strange and unusual things for sale, including Chicken Feet. The Meat and Produce is incredibly cheap there, so I buy all my fresh ingredients from them.

I like Garlic, so I use about 6 cloves (about equivalent to 4 large cloves). I like the hint of Ginger, so I try to be careful not to overdo it. I use about the same amount of Ginger as a I do Garlic, but between the two, prefer more Garlic.

I used to add 1 Tablespoon of Chili Flakes, but I skipped them in the batch I made today, and it's plenty spicy without them.

The Oil is vague. I probably use more Oil than the recipe calls for.


1. Peel and Finely Slice the Garlic. Cut away the outsides of the Ginger, and Finely Slice.

2. Combine Garlic, Ginger, Red Pepper Paste, Soy Sauce, Sugar, Syrup, Sesame Seeds, and Sesame Oil in a mixing bowl. Stir. When ingredients are mixed, stir in Sliced Pork.

3. Skin the Onion, and chop it in to medium or large chunks (i.e. not fine). Big enough to see.

4. Heat up "other Oil" in pan. When Oil is hot, add contents of mixing bowl, stirring regularly. Add Onions after a few minutes (I chop them after adding bowl to pan).

5. Stir regularly for about 15 minutes, until Pork is cooked and onions have softened.

6. Serve with rice.
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Edited by PoV on Thu Dec 18, 2014 7:29 pm; edited 2 times
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Sirocco
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That looks tasty. I sorely regret there's no place around here that sells fresh udon noodles. I absolutely love their texture.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh right, I made a sad discovery the other day. Apparently a lot of BBQ sauces contains Ketchup. There are some that don't, like some that use Mustard instead, but I was kind-of sad to find out that BBQ sauce was just a basic condiment on steroids. ;)

* * *

I think my next recipe goal will be to tackle Honey Bourbon Chicken. There's a fast-food Chinese chain in Mall Food Courts here that have this wonderful sweet chicken, and despite the name, I'm pretty sure contains no Bourbon. I'd like to figure out both, as cooking with Booze is great.

Some initial reading:

http://realmomkitchen.com/10700/honey-bourbon-crock-pot-chicken/

Funny thing, that recipe is almost exactly Korean Spicy Pork, but replace the meat with Chicken thighs, and the Red Pepper Paste with Honey... and a Squirt of Ketchup?

Anyways, I'll look in to it later. Just need some Chicken and Honey.

* * *

I actually have 2 more recipes I'd like to write down. My relatively new but really good Greek Green Bean recipe (Fasolakia), and funny enough a Scrambled Egg which I'm really happy with.

I have 2 more I'm on the fence about.

I do a simple but nice Chickpea curry, but my reservation is that it uses a 6 year old "Medium Curry Powder" spice shaker that's been sitting in my cupboard unused. I need to make it again, and see what grocery stores carry, to see if it's OK to just say "curry powder". I'm not even sure how much I add. I keep adding it until I can taste it. ;)

The other, I make great Tandori Chicken Wings. It might actually be the most complicated recipe I make (I wear rubber gloves, skin my chicken, and do precise measurements of spice). The problem is I'm reliant on another spice pack. I use a mix of this one packet, a "Tandori Chiciken" marinade in a box (just add Yogourt, Garlic, Ginger, Lemon Juice, coat the chicken, and marinate for 2 hours). I stretch the packet by combining it with a generic "Tandori Masala" that the grocery store sells, and though the ingredients are different the taste is very similar. It needs some refinement, but it's already excellent.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Instructables sez I can make my own ersatz Udon noodles.

I think I know what I'll be trying this weekend :)
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do it! :D

I half-assed a Fresh Ramen one time, and though I didn't do the greatest job (wrong noodle), it was still very good.

* * *

Here's my Signature Scrambled Egg Breakfast. :)



Code:
- 2 Large Eggs
- 3 Strips of Uncooked Bacon
- 2 Slices of Bread
- 1 whole Green Onion
- Salt and Pepper Mills
- Margarine (or Butter)
- Orange Juice

This is a complete meal for one. The order and timing is EXTREMELY important, as we use the Bacon Grease, and do something unusual with the Salt+Pepper.


1. Heat Frying Pan at Medium (or higher) heat, and add the Bacon. Occasionally flip and turn the bacon to cook evenly. While Bacon cooks, continue.

2. Crack both eggs in to a bowl and Scramble with a fork. When yolks and whites are nicely combined, continue.

3. Slice up entire Green Onion in to small thin slices. You should have both Leafy Green slices and small Onion slices. If there's a piece with roots, feel free to throw it away.

4. Add Sliced Green Onion to bowl, and mix together. DO NOT ADD SALT OR PEPPER!

5. Prepare a serving plate with a folded sheet of Paper Towel on it, and set aside another sheet.

6. When Bacon has reached desired crispyness, remove from pan and place on the Plated Paper Towel. Cover Bacon with the other sheet of Paper Towel. This is to both keep it warm, and to absorb excess grease. Set plate aside.

7. If preparing Toast, you should either drop the Bread in to and start the Toaster now, or do it before you plate the Bacon.

8. Make sure inside the pan is coated with the Bacon Grease. Drain excess Bacon grease, but DO NOT WASH PAN! Any leftover Grease or Bacon bits will add flavor to the Egg.

9. Return pan to Heat. Place a nob of margarine (or butter) in the pan. Just a little bit, so we get both a Bacon and a Buttery flavor. When Margarine (Butter) is melted, make sure pan is well coated.

10. When Pan is hot again (it may still be hot), pour the bowl of Egg and Onion in to the pan. If it's hot enough, the egg should immediately start cooking and setting. TURN OFF HEAT. The rest of the cooking will be done using the remaining heat of the Element and Pan.

11. Push cooked egg in to middle of pan, and tilt pan to let runny egg fill gaps.

12. When you can't push and pour runny egg anymore, NOW grind fresh Salt and Pepper over the eggs. If you've never tried this, it make a BIG difference.

13. Flip egg, Runny side down (cooked side up). The remaining heat of the Pan and Element should be enough to finish cooking the egg.

14. By now your Toast should pop. As the Egg finishes, take the Plate, and move over to your Toaster. Use the Paper Towel to clean excess Grease off the plate, removing the Bacon from the Paper Towel. Discard the Paper Towel. Butter the toast on the Plate. Arrange Bacon and Toast to make room for the Egg.

15. After finishing with the Toast, pour a glass of Orange Juice, and by the time you're done the Egg will be finished cooking. Plate the Egg, and Serve.
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Edited by PoV on Thu Dec 18, 2014 9:22 pm; edited 1 time
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An old photo of my Greek Green Beans (Fasolakia), and Tandori Chicken in the background.



I made a spicy batch of the Green Beans yesterday, with Bacon (it's normally Vegetables only), and they were amazing! I wish I had a photo of that. :D

I'm digging through my twitter, trying to find a photo for Scrambled Egg post.


Here's a closeup of what my Tandori Chicken looks like before I put it in the oven:



And here's after:



Looks like Magma. Tastes like Magma. Delicious Magma.


Here's a cooking shot of the Chickpea Curry.




And that one time I tried to make Fresh Ramen.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Signature Scrambled Egg Breakfast


The judicious reuse of cooked-out fat is the key to a lot of tasty recipes. Good scrambled eggs are difficult to cook for the first time. After you get it right once it's no problem :)

I think I'm going to try cooking the udon this weekend, and accompany it with some chicken in teriyaki marinade (the thick stuff).

Your pics remind me that I really want a flat-top range.
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Sirocco
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried making udon this evening, topped with some chicken marinated in sweet teriyaki sauce. Aside from the noodles coming out about 2-3x thicker than they should have been, it was good. The noodles had that distinct udon texture I was looking for. I'll need to keep playing with the recipe to get it just right.

I'm also going to have to find a better way to slice the noodles. They need to be really damn thin, because they poof up like crazy when you cook them.

Too bad I don't feel like throwing ~560 USD at a sweet-ass noodle-maker.
Edit: The US version is ~350 USD, and you can buy a ~30 USD kit to make ramen and udon with it. Tempting. Very, damn, tempting.
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PoV
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Holy Shit. That's awesome.


I've thought about grabbing one of these:

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/kitchen/small-appliances/food-mixers-accessories/mixer-accessories/kitchenaid-pasta-roller-set-3-pc-0432203p.html

But I should probably do it from scratch a bunch first. My Chinese Grocery store is pretty good though, so *shrug*.
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Sirocco
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm really tempted to just buy one (the noodle-making thingy), and never tell anyone. Heh! People tend to get weirded-out over expensive, dedicated appliances. Whereas no one would bat an eye over a stainless-steel fridge :|
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PoV
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I have this Spice Mill I purchased... probably 5 or 6 years ago. It's been my favourite go-to way to spice meats for many years.

Alas, the mill is running out, so I've taken it upon myself to figure out the contents (before I use it all up). Here's what's inside (salt omitted).



Left: ??? (but there is a lot of it)

Right, top to bottom:
- White Peppercorns?
- Coriander?
- Black Peppercorns
- Dried Garlic?

It's been suggested that the left one might be some sort of peel or dried fruit. The detailing visually reminds me of a mushroom. The flavour has a slight hint of sweet to it.

So yeah, next challenge is figuring out what I've actually been using all these years, before it's too late. ;)
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