GDR Forum Index
Podcast Podcast
Dev Dev Logs
Search Search
RSS RSS
Register Register
Log in Log in
Reply to topic GDR Forum Index -> Game Developer's Refuge -> Cooking Thread. Ya, that's food making yo! Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Second day, the meatloaf cut waaay easier.

Ha! I'm actually more used to 2nd-day meatloaf than I am fresh.

Anyways, if it wasn't for the oversized vegetables in the meatloaf, it would have held together perfectly. This I know now. Every break reveals some honking large onions.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well it looks like I'm on a Meatloaf kick.

After wrapping up Ludum Dare 39, I decided to celebrate by making another meatloaf.

One thing I really like about meatloaf is that it's so much easier to make than some of my other dishes. I think the prep including sauteeing took no more than 45 minutes, but I did decide to keep the recipe simple.



Started with a mix of finely chopped onion, crushed garlic, and a jalepeno. Sauteed them in a pan with salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes to reduce them.



(they were more done before I took them off the heat)

After taking them off the heat, I deglazed with bit of white wine, which worked great to release some of the browning on the pan and on to the vegetables.

I should have let them cool more, but I went ahead and added them to:

* about 2 lbs of lean ground beef (a bit less)
* 1 lb of regular ground pork
* 1 cup of milk soaked breadcrumbs (yes I literally added milk to a bowl of breadcrumbs, stirred them, came back and it solidified)
* 2 eggs
* pepper, salt
* dry oregano, basil, and thyme
* little bit of chicken stock

Mixed together by hand. Result was a very mushy mush. I wasn't sure it was going to solidify that well at first.

On a sheet of parchment paper, I placed it inside a cake pan, and made an effort NOT to touch the sides. I also shaped it best I could height and width wise in to a rectangular blob of meat.

Finally, I spread a mixture of ketchup and steak sauce on top. Covered with tinfoil.

Put it in the oven at 375 F for 1 hour.



Tinfoil removed, it was quite moist. Almost an inch of liquid in the pan!!

Thanks to its large size, I was able to safely drain the liquid from the pan without the loaf sliding much. I put it back in the oven for 15 minutes to brown.



I was actually ready to throw it in again, but after 15 minutes... you know, that actually looked totally fine.

Let stand for 10 minutes.



Beautiful.

Sliced much better, and had excellent stability compared to the first attempt.



Very moist, but stable.




It looked just like my late grandmother's meat loaf, so I served it like my late grandmother's meatloaf: On a plate, with some HP steak sauce.

I haven't had my late grandmother's meatloaf in like a decade (she stopped cooking later in life), but I'd like to think I did a pretty acceptable interpretation. It was almost entirely improvised. Took a few ideas I read earlier in the week, and put them in to practice.

To be honest, there's not much to complain about.


Tasting just the meat (no sauce), I'm actually pretty happy with this. I bet this exact recipe would make a good meatball (i.e. the same thing in ball form vs loaf). It might be tricker to drain the liquid before browning, but that's fine.

Huh.

I think that's a win.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow. A dry aged steak for $5? You better believe I'm buying it. Hell, I'm cooking it right now too (11 PM).



This is the day you've been waiting for, Cast Iron pan I restored weeks ago.



Seasoned with Salt and Pepper (more pepper wouldn't have hurt). Knob of butter in the pan, some dry Thyme and Rosmary. Basted with the butter as it cooked.



:D



Even the fat was good. ;)


I love this pan.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
sonrisu
Moderator

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 4998
Location: Silicon Valley!
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use my cast iron to cook literally everything that requires stove top cooking. They are the best. :]
_________________
loomsoft :]
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sirocco
Moderator

Joined: 19 Aug 2005
Posts: 9459
Location: Not Finland
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Goddamn, that looks delicious :D

Pepper-crusted steak is so good. And it doesn't overwhelm the flavor, so you can go a little heavy without hurting the dish.
_________________
NoOP / Reyn Time -- The $ is screwing everyone these days. (0xDB)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I grabbed a Pressure Cooker for cheap ($30) some weeks ago. I still haven't used it, and until this evening I may have forgotten I had it.

So I started doing some searches, and some things that caught my eye were curries. Indian, Thai, and Japanese.

https://www.justonecookbook.com/pressure-cooker-japanese-curry/



I've had a pack of Japanese curry in my pantry for ... gosh, it's been years. I think I may give the above recipe a try tomorrow, both to try it and to try out the pressure cooker.

The only ingredient I need is Chicken.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love spit food.



Obviously it's not practical to have a slow roasting spit at home (also that cleanup, ouch). But I can explore some ideas like it.

I can get a fantastic Shawarma and Gyro at two different places here in town, as well as some "lesser but still good" ones just few minutes away. But I'm kinda intrigued by Tacos al Pastor.

https://www.mylatinatable.com/best-tacos-al-pastor-recipe/

I can't remember if I've had them before or not. I've been to some classy parties in San Francisco that had tiny food-truck tacos. The video above summarizes what's great about spit food, the slow cooked nice crispy outside and tender inside. I can probably come up with something, like roasting it on a stick/butterknife in the oven (like a fake immoble spit).

Hmm.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay that's interesting. This woman's Gyro meat recipe is nearly identical to my meatloaf, except she uses Lamb+Beef (I tend to do Pork+Beef), and Cumin.



I need to check a few more recipes, see if Cumin and Lamb really are the main differences.


EDIT: Okay, recipes are more random than I thought. Even more indistinguishable from meat loaf.

- Some use cumin, some don't
- Some use other spices (marjoram, rosemary, paprika)
- Pretty much any spice is fair game
- The only real distinguishing factor is the fine mince in a food processor, rather than allowing it to be a bit chunky

Supposedly "authentic" Gyros aren't even lamb. Pork, exactly like a Tacos Al Pastor is the more traditional meat, just different seasoning (less spicy).

I've seen some that go ground Beef+Lamb+Pork in a 2:2:1 ratio, and others that go with just meat on a spit (again indistinguishable from other spit roasted meats).


Conclusion: .. *shrug*. I guess it boils down to what you want to serve it on (a pita or a tortilla), and what toppings and sauce. Hmm.


Well in general I guess I need to cook more with Cumin (and Paprika, and Turmeric). Really all the spices and seasonings. The only one I seem to really have a grasp of is salt. Not even Pepper I feel I truly get (but I'm far more confident with it than I used to be).
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay I didn't expect this. Watched this dude make a Cheddar cheese. He documented the process, but it's mostly waiting.

Start:


3 Months:


6 Months:


1 Year:


Before I started I was all "naw, I don't need to make cheese". But by the end dude had become a sweater wearing grandpa in a chair sampling his cheese. It's almost comical.

But clearly he has the last laugh, 'cause now I'm thinking "if I had a basement, okay, I would want to try that". Actually I want to try aging some meat too. Wine-making I can do without (Dad did it, it was okay. Box wine is cheap enough). But shit, aging food is more up my alley.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Speaking of shaved meat at home.

I like how they used a skewer stick in an onion here, and baked. That's rather classy.


EDIT: Or here's an actual Tacos Al Pastor recipe, the result of a bunch of research on cuts of meat and cooking method:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/05/food-lab-tacos-al-pastor.html

Requires a pre-cooking step, but seems to be well received.

It also uses Bacon, which just makes everything better.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
syn9ne
Contributor

Joined: 09 Jan 2010
Posts: 351

PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow that looks amazing...
_________________
The Hideout Games :: #thehideout on freenode.net :: Pinterest :: Greenlight
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I ended up at a grocery store this evening. While I was there...



... I found a good price for a Pork Shoulder/Butt (~$8). Cool.


I mentioned Cubano Sandwiches a couple pages ago. I improvised an interpretation using polish deli meats, and frankly it was actually pretty good. But the thing I was missing was the Mojo Pork. i.e. a pork shoulder marinated in Orange Juice, Citrus, Garlic, and Spices.

Orange Juice is my #2 favourite beverage, and I've found a lot of recipes that call for other Citrus (Lime, Lemon), but I've been hankering for something that uses orange.

Of course the whole Cubano Sandwich thing is inspired by the Jon Favreau movie "Chef". And this awesome YouTuber made a great breakdown video.



And gawd damn it, him standing there going "OMG" drives me crazy. I need to try Mojo Pork. :D

So that's the plan. I'm going to pick up ingredients tomorrow and start the first part (takes 12 hours in the fridge), then hopefully roast this up on Sunday, and enjoy me some Cubanos.


If this works out, I have the best date idea. ;)
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So heh, it looks like this will effectively be a 48 hour recipe. ;)



Trimmed off some excess fat from the pork, and scored. The shoulder was actually too big to fin in my bowl, so I cut it in half, and vacuum sealed the other half.



First time I've used my vacuum sealer. ;)

Prepared a brine of Orange Juice, Spiced Rum, Garlic, Herbs, and a few other ingredients... lots of salt of course (it's a brine).





And submerged.


Running late, I pulled the pork out of the Brine 40-some hours later.



Now a marinade of juice and zest of oranges and limes (plus the limes themselves to fill space).



Cilantro, Mint, Oregano, oh and MORE garlic.



Submerged the pork in the marinade for another couple hours.

I only really gave it a bit over 2 hours in the marinade, so I ended up with a layer of thick marinade on top before roasting.



It should be coming out soon. ;)
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Well I'm not going to say it's the best thing ever, but there's a lot to like about it. I've definitely never tasted this before.

My cut was pretty fatty, so after eating all the good stuff along the outside (cough), I didn't quite end up with as much meat as I would have liked. There was also the middle part. According to the thermometer it was up to temperature, but I wasn't happy with how it looked. So I disposed of some of it. I cooked it at 375 degrees instead of 350 as was recommended, so it took a bit under 2 hours. I blame that for making the middle less than desirable (or maybe the cut, I don't know).

What I would change:

- Start buying better limes. It's hard to zest fruit without a bumpy surface
- Stick with the 12 hour (i.e. overnight) brine. Maybe use a little less OJ in a smaller bowl.
- Buy the correct ingredients, lol. I made a mistake, and bought something called "Fish Mint", which I thought was "Fresh Mint". I also bought Italian Parsley instead of Cilantro. Anyway, I know what the leaf looks like now.
- More marinate time (3-4 hours?)
- Slow cook for lower longer. Stick with 350, or maybe go 330 and cook for 3+ hours.

Anyway, tomorrow we make Cuban Sandwiches with real Mojo Pork.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haha, by the way, I ended up abort those Cuban Sawdwiches.

Shortly after snacking on the pork (freaking delicious mind you), I get EXTREMELY gassy. Like REAL BAD. It kinda freaked me out, so I quietly disposed of it. Ah well, you win some and you lose some.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually had no plans to cook today, but the Binging with Babbish guy had a cook-along livestream, and I got inspired watching that.

So I ran out, grabbed ingredients...



...and made fancy mac & cheese.

That saw me:

- boiling water
- cooking the pasta
- shredding a bunch of cheese (Cheddar, Gruyere (holy f*ck that's an expensive cheese), and Parmesano Reggano)
- making a bechamel (milk, butter, flour)
- adding the cheese to the bechamel
- mixing the cooked noodles and cheese sauce together
- pouring it in to a tray
- toasting some breadcrumbs in a pan
- shredding more Parmesano Reggano on top
- adding toasted breadcrumbs on top
- and finally baking for about 35 minutes (15 covered in foil, 10 uncovered, 8 with the broiler to brown the top)







It's very tasty, but I'm not convinced my cheese choices were good. The Gruyere was recommended as a funky cheese. It's expensive ($12 for a 350g block, I used half), and it definitely added some character, but I'm not sold on my cheddar choice. A bargain old cheddar that was IMO way too soft to be what I consider old (i.e. 1-2 year age). Suffice to say I wont be buying this cheddar again (not for that price). It would make a fine taco cheese, but nothing classy. Nowhere near as good as my "snack" cheddars.

My bechamel, I got worried it was too thin (nope). Used up some old unsalted butter I had sitting around, so that was alright. The cheese melted alright. Sauce was a bit lumpy, but that's not necessarily bad. It did the job. Overall this worked waaaaay better than my attempt at Fettuccine Alfredo (duh, Mike knows how to make a roux now).

Toasting breadcrumbs was neat. I dunno if it did much to the flavour, but it certainly looked better. :)

Used the whole box of noodle, and that actually fit the pan quite well. Good to know.


Again, ultimately it was actually very tasty. On par with, if not the best I've tasted or made. My problem is I feel like it could be more to it.

Maybe not.

It was basically just excellent Mac & Cheese. I guess I've tasted some really excellent cheddars (been keeping up my cheese snacking), and my poor choice (trying to save a buck) didn't do me any favours.

Anyway, I have lunches for the next few days, and some in the freezer for later. I wonder what's missing?
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
sonrisu
Moderator

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 4998
Location: Silicon Valley!
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Baked mac&cheese without mustard in the recipe? Blasphemy.

Also blasphemy is eating it without hot sauce added in (after it's cooked).

Try it sometime. You won't be disappointed (unless you can't do "spicy"). :]
_________________
loomsoft :]
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mustard what? I went with an expensive funky cheese (Le Gruyere), so whatever depth mustard added was probably in that neighbourhood (sans vinegar).

Chef wisdom: if a dish needs anything (salt or a sauce like ketchup, salsa, or sriracha), it's not seasoned enough. ;)


That said I loooove spicy, but I'm dating a girl who can-not take spicy at all (not even black pepper). So in the grand science of things, I am trying to practice cooking things that stand-out without my go-to of fresh Jalepeno, Chilli Flakes, or Dried+Smoked Ancho Peppers (I love what they do for flavour). Though this wasn't something I was planning for her, but hey, it could be added to the short list.

My mistake was that I paired a cheap Cheddar with an expensive Funky (and a dried-out Parmigiano Reggano). Still tastes great mind you.

Looking at the pool of grease on this plate from the leftovers I just had (not bad, but noticeable), I might have used a bit too much butter.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
sonrisu
Moderator

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 4998
Location: Silicon Valley!
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep. Mustard. Dijon. Coarse ground. Trust me, and find a recipe that uses it. If you like spicy/vinegary, it's the best.

Not joking. I've had plenty of different baked mac recipes.

The ones that use mustard always rise above the rest. :]
_________________
loomsoft :]
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Noted. :)
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
Sirocco
Moderator

Joined: 19 Aug 2005
Posts: 9459
Location: Not Finland
PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Not joking. I've had plenty of different baked mac recipes.

The ones that use mustard always rise above the rest. :]


Seconded!
_________________
NoOP / Reyn Time -- The $ is screwing everyone these days. (0xDB)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did a bunch of reading and yeah, this is apparently a thing.

The key is not specifically mustard, but an acid (vinegar, cider, vinegar based hot sauces, whisky). Supposedly it does something interesting to the flavour of the heavier ingredients (cheeses). Well that sounds like something worth trying. ;)
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pizza.

I think I'm really close to figuring it out.

Though I already have a Pizza Steel, I recently picked up a fancy Pizza Stone for a cheap price.



One of these. Got it for about $22 (reg $55). https://www.amazon.com/Emile-Henry-Perfect-Breads-Surface/dp/B003UI8B2S

The selling feature of this stone is that you can cut on it (and it's safe up to 900 F), but so far I haven't done so. I don't have the best place to put it after heating up, so "stay in the oven" it is.


I stumbled across this video, which gave me a good idea.



i.e. Place the pizza stone BENEATH THE BROILER (i.e. top oven elements).
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pizza continued...

So with that new knowledge I sort of tried it out.

Started by making a sauce.



- Canned whole Italian tomatoes (crush them with a masher or spatula)
- 4 cloves of garlic (crush them with a garlic crusher)
- Salt and Pepper to taste... and actually taste, noting that it will get more salty as it reduces
- Simmer for an hour+, until less watery (it should be visible chunky)

Finally used my new peel. Gave the dough about an hour to warm up to room temperature. Turns out it could actually use more (packaging said 2 hours, and I think it's correct).



I didn't follow the video instructions exactly last time. Rather, I slightly improvised.

Ended up with this:



Wow.

FINALLY, the crust was decent. I could have gone hotter. The stone only reached 400 F, but roughly 6 minutes including some broiler time made something nearly perfect.


That video above. I think they are exactly right.

- Preheat oven as hot as it goes (500 F, or higher), 45-60 minutes.
- Check pizza stone with infrared thermometer
- Turn on broiler for a few minutes to heat surface of pizza stone
- Check again
- Turn OFF broiler, insert pizza.
- 90 seconds later, rotate pizza
- Turn ON broiler, 3 minutes.
- Turn OFF broiler, rotate pizza, and wait 90 more seconds.
- Remove and let cool for a couple minutes.

That makes me think.

- Pull dough out of fridge.
- Wait 1 hour.
- Set oven to preheat, maximum temperature.
- Wait 40 minutes (even if it beeps, the stone needs more time)
- Spread out the dough to pizza size/shape (this never goes perfectly, dough always retracts)
- Switch oven to Broiler mode.
- Assemble pizza.
- Turn OFF Broiler, insert pizza.
- etc.
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
PoV
Moderator

Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 10902
Location: Canadia
PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had to try it again. It was SO CLOSE earlier.





This time I let the oven heat up as much as it could (525 F), and switched to the Broiler as suggested. Generally speaking I followed all the suggested instructions, but found out that it did need a touch more time.

True cooking time in my oven should be 8 minutes.

- 2 minutes with residual heat (the goal is to solidify the pizza so it can be turned)
- 3 minutes with broiler
- 3 minutes with residual heat

I might try going 4 minutes broiler with a pie for myself, but for a guest it was the right amount of top browning.

Another nice idea: soak the basil leaves in olive oil. This protects them a bit (other suggestions were to soak them in brine). What this also lets you do is pour the olive oil more slowly out of a small dish (I always find out of the bottle it pours too fast).

One other thing I could try is turning off the broiler AFTER putting the pizza in (to maintain more initial heat).

Finally, I still need to try a whole pie. I took a pizza dough and divided it in to 3 parts, making 3 smaller pizzas.


Anyway, I think I'm pretty close to having a recipe method I'm happy with.


- Place Pizza Stone/Steel on highest rack of oven.
- Remove dough from fridge.
- Wait 90 minutes.
- Set oven to pre-heat at 500 F (or more)
- (optionally remove dough from package, coat with olive oil, and cover with plastic wrap)
- Wait 30 minutes.
- Empty dough, and add flour until it stops sticking.
- Flour the peel. Just enough that when you put the dough on it, and shake, it doesn't stick. Check often that it doesn't stick.
- Spread and stretch the dough, and place on the peel. Make sure it doesn't stick by shaking/jerking the peel.
- Switch oven to Broiler mode at highest temperature.
- Top the pizza (see below)
- Put pizza in oven by shaking it off the peel
- Turn OFF Broiler (residual heat)
- Wait 2 minutes.
- With tongs, rotate Pizza 90 degrees.
- Turn ON Broiler.
- Wait 3 minutes.
- With tongs, rotate Pizza 90 degrees.
- Turn OFF Broiler.
- Wait 3 minutes.
- Remove Pizza from oven, place on cooling rack, let sit for 4-5 minutes.
- Transfer to cutting surface, and slice the pizza
- Serve.

Margarita Pizza
- Take some fresh Basil, and coat it with some olive oil (enough to drizzle on pizza later)
- Add a layer of sauce, spread with spoon. Not too thick. It's best if you can actually see some dough through the sauce in a few spots.
- (optionally add a light sprinkling of salt and/or pepper)
- Cut up chunks of Mozzarella cheese, or cut slices and tear chunks out of them, and top them. Again, you don't need 100% coverage. Gaps are good.
- Take Basil leaves from mixture, and top pizza with them.
- Drizzle the pizza with the leftover olive oil
- Grate some fresh Parmigiano Reggiano


FINALLY, a restaurant quality pizza at home.


Crust is soft and crispy. Even the char is really nice (if you've ever had pizza at a fancy Italian restaurant with a proper oven, it's got that going for it). Comparing photos, yes I think I will try 4 minute Broiler next time. I think I like it a touch more charred.

There's one detail I need to double check; if it tastes too floury still. It might not, but this is something I need to double check. I included a recommendation above to pre-coat it with some olive oil, which is something I didn't check.

Anyway, with this approach, I can finally say my home-made pizza is good. One I would proudly serve to a friend (or girlfriend). ;)
_________________
Mike Kasprzak
'eh whatever. I used to make AAA and Indie games | Ludum Dare | Blog | Tweetar
View user's profile Send private message
Reply to topic GDR Forum Index -> Game Developer's Refuge -> Cooking Thread. Ya, that's food making yo! Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
Game Developer's Refuge
is proudly hosted by,

HostGator

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners. All comments owned by their respective posters.
phpBB code © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group. Other message board code © Kevin Reems.